REPORTS MADE TO POLICE BY ALISON CHABLOZ 2016 – 2021 — WHY NO ACTION?

  • Update December 16th

Despite a public consultation and 2020 recommendation by the Law Commission that notorious s.127 of the Communications Act 2003 was be repealed, Rishi Sunak’s government has decided to keep the anti-free speech legislation on its books. The about-turn was announced November 28th, just shy of four weeks after my Appeal was due to be heard at Southwark Crown Court, but was (again, for the second time) adjourned – because, apparently, no judge was available to hear the case…

To retain protections for victims of abuse, the government will no longer repeal elements of the Malicious Communications Act and Section 127 of the Communications Act offences, which means the criminal law will continue to protect people from harmful communications, including racist, sexist and misogynisteic abuse.

(For some reason, comments were not enabled for this post, now corrected.)

Original post:

It took almost two years for police to respond, half-heartedly, to reports submitted in 2014 on advice from the Musician’s Union, for harassment of me by Ambrosine Chetrit of “Eye on Antisemitism.” As well as creating sockpuppet accounts to stalk and harass, Chetrit incited her followers to abuse me; hate mail and death threats were sent to my address; my close family members were also openly targeted.

Despite plenty of hard evidence of a vicious smear campaign and deliberate course of action intended to cause me harm, police obviously weren’t interested.

In 2015, Chetrit also colluded with Campaign Against Antisemitism “CAA” Enforcement Officer, Steve Silverman, then trolling under a vulgar nom de guerre, “Bedlam Jones”. As advised by police themselves, I kept reporting the abuse. To no avail.

Presumably, it was the over-excitement of appearing for the first time in Court to testify against me, in December 2016, that caused Silverman to commit a game-changing gaffe.

In a signed witness statement submitted to Court by CAA’s then solicitor, Stephen Gilchrist, Silverman’s comment, in brackets, — that I have “remarkably” correctly guessed the Twitter account he used, — is wholly incriminating. (The account has since been renamed to @SSilvUK.) How many times did I report this account to Derbyshire Constabulary during the previous 18 months? How many times was I told by officers that this campaign of harassment of me was “under investigation by the CPS”? — Too many to count.

As noted above, both Chetrit and Silverman (and their associates) have been reported multiple times to police, initially to Derbyshire Constabulary and more recently to the Metropolitan Police Service.

Why has no action been taken to prevent further abuse of process?

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Precedent or no precedent?

British nationalists seem unable to decide.

Two weeks ago, French revisionist and exile to Britain, Vincent Reynouard, was arrested and is currently in custody in Edinburgh waiting to see if he will be extradited back to his home country. Reynouard has been convicted multiple times for négationisme of authorised ww2 historiography, arriving here in 2015 to avoid being sent back to jail for a video published on social media.

Reynouard has since been resentenced in absentia to two more short prison sentences for similar offences under French anti-free speech legislation, la loi Gayssot. In Britain, where there is no such law, he has continued his activities, making detailed videos that expose his historical findings.

Another aspect of his work involves highlighting the abuse and personal attacks coming from militant Zionist adversaries online. Dating back at least four years before my own legal troubles began in 2016, in my experience such tactics are all too familiar.

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Welcome back to all my readers

As predicted, April 14th 2022, the day of my sentencing for again causing gross offence with a satirical song, I was handed almost the maximum term: 22 weeks, eleven of which to be served at HMP Bronzefield near Heathrow, west London, and the rest ‘on Licence’.

Exactly the same as last year: sent to jail on Maundy Thursday, meaning that my first week was spent without access to my own money, without canteen supplies and, worst of all, without access to a telephone.

I repeat: exactly the same scenario as last year. I was unable to reach my family for almost an entire week and only found out after Easter that my mother had been rushed into hospital – as had happened also last year.

My plea for bail, pending Appeal — — including two official complaints to the Lord Chief Justice — took an extraordinary six weeks to be heard, and was rejected on grounds that I would be eligible for early release ‘on tag’.

Again: exactly the same as last year, no tag was granted and I was kept behind bars until the end of June. Following this latest unsuccessful bail hearing, my Appeal against both conviction and sentencing was listed to be heard at Southwark Crown Court, the day following my release, June 30th.

It quickly became apparent during my stay that efforts were afoot to bait me into committing some further offence, for some form of ‘racism’, whilst inside. Mindful of events that affected author, Hervé Ryssen, during his spell in prison in France, I stood my ground, clarified in writing my position and made sure to keep a record of events.

My final ten days were spent in isolation owing to an outbreak of the flu’ (now rebranded as Covid19.) On day five, mass testing on my wing returned a positive Lateral Flow test.

The day of my release, after being forced under duress to sign five pages’ worth of ultra-strict Licence terms basically insinuating that I would be a terrorist, I was told that I would have to wait till lunchtime for a medical certificate stating my ‘Covid’ status, because the Head of Health Care hadn’t yet arrived for work…

Finally, I made it to my first meeting with Probation and was told to go home and rest, and that they would call me.

I was quite poorly for the next few days, with sickness and vomiting – as if I had been poisoned. But I survived.

My initial sentence is now fully served, although I am bound by Standard Licence until September 2023 – unless I am successful on Appeal, now adjourned until November 3rd – thanks to Covid.

Many thanks also to all for your messages of love and support. I will get round to replying to everyone, eventually.

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In light of the total silence from certain prominent individuals representing groups here in England, who claim to champion rights to free expression, I accepted to work on new lyrics penned by my long-time co-author, the hugely talented Gerard Menuhin.

The new song is a follow-up to an earlier number, produced in November 2020. Something of a marathon at eight minutes long, I sing the role of Michele Mainwaring, aka Countess Griaznoff, aka “Lady” Michele Renouf.

Politics, they say, is a dirty business. The question needs to be asked: why is it that my former associates belonging to the Britnat Social Club (including leaders of Patriotic Alternative) have nothing to say about my latest conviction?

The unavoidable conclusion is that they have been working alongside my accusers from the start.

The song that saw me jailed again from Easter to the summer solstice was about Tommy Robinson – despite the judge’s remarks. Only recently did I learn that Robinson’s wife is, apparently, a niece of the late Richard Edmonds… This would explain why, following my first conviction, Edmonds’ advice to me was that I should try to rejoin the Labour party(!). It also helps to clarify his later hatchet job, published by Hope Not Hate satellite mag, Heritage and Destiny, shortly before another of my Court hearings back in 2019.

News of Renouf’s latest gallivanting in fancy dress occasionally soils my inbox. No surprise that these forwarded messages urge correspondents to share some self-publicising clip on Twitter.

Gerard’s latest lyrics were sent to me whilst I was in prison. His and other letters were – exactly the same as last year – withheld by ‘security staff’ who found the content ‘inappropriate.’ Perhaps the c word? I don’t know.

Learning the lyrics by heart and filming (in a wig!) was fun, as have been my few private performances for friends. This version is far from perfect, but it’s a decent enough performance with just a couple of snags towards the end that I managed to patch up using equipment that I currently have at hand.

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It is surreal enough, being the granddaughter of a British soldier who fought and died for his country and having been sent to jail for testing the limits of free speech – for which, I was always told, my grandad sacrificed his life. Those so-called patriots who decided to throw me under the bus are, to reuse a term employed by Labour deputy, Angela Rayner, scum. Despite all their posturing, it seems not in their (financial) interest to actually want to challenge the prescribed narrative concerning WW2.

I have now been jailed twice for singing satirical songs. My right to express myself publicly (and indeed online) as a performing artist has been taken away. This removal of my rights under law has been rubber-stamped by a corrupt Criminal Justice System, and ignored by ‘patriots’ who appear to still believe that Tommy Robinson is the messiah.

If Tommy had any mettle about him in this case, then he might, as one Twitter user suggests, offer to pay my fine. Tommy supported Count Dankula aka Marcus Meecham, yet has nothing much to say about my unique case. Asides the gaslighting and slurs, labelling me a ‘retard’ is unhelpful, as well as downright hypocritical.

Contrary to the facts, several of my original accusers — among whom are two of those who testified against me in Court — now seem to be suggesting that I was jailed for harassment, rather than for causing gross upset with satirical songs. This and other issues not mentioned above are due to be raised with the relevant authorities prior to my November appeal. Until then, once again many thanks to all those with the guts and gumption to lend their support. I hope you enjoy the new song.

No comment…

Comments have been temporarily switched off on this website. For how long is uncertain. Following yesterday’s post, a number of comments and pingbacks were approved. The pingback, apparently some kind of tech issue, was quickly resolved. However, the next time I checked, another comment (plus two replies) were missing from at least one browser display. In order to not cause too many headaches before Thursday, I have decided to disable comments.

The weather is sunny and warm. Can it really be only by coincidence that, once again on Maundy Thursday, I am to be sent to prison, once again for singing a satirical song?

As mentioned yesterday and in another recent article, this latest trial against me for singing a parody song has now been dragged out for nearly two years. At the first instance hearing, when the more serious charge against me for incitement was dropped, I was already in prison and would have preferred, if found guilty and sentenced, to have continued the stretch to get it over and done with.

But no. Here we are again, at Easter (see image below from April 7th 2021), meaning two bank holidays and therefore a larger-than-usual backlog in court listings over the next fortnight. No doubt Bronzefield will once again be experiencing the usual weekend staff shortages, further exacerbated by the long weekend. And not only is it Easter: it’s also the start of the growing season, and the barbecue season… There is no end to the vindictiveness of it all.

Before leaving, I would like to express my gratitude to my barrister, Adrian Davies, whose impressive experience and knowledge of law was clearly in evidence in court last week. More precise thoughts on the two-year long, all-out effort by the Crown to further gag, punish and demoralise me, and on Judge Tempia’s ruling, shall have to wait for another day.

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You can still contact me here. It’s also possible to donate via this page. Many thanks for all your support.







An early birthday gift has arrived

Some of you will know that, last year, my birthday was spent behind bars. This year, thanks to one immensely kind and generous friend, a far nicer birthday present arrived early – a digital piano.

It’s a Yamaha Piaggero 32 and has six and half octaves of semi-weighted keys, great speakers and a very decent range of sounds. I am over the moon.

If I could get my hands on the large repertoire of professional backing tracks still in police possession, I would be able to entertain until next year’s birthday.

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Accused without being served

Court double-faults with poor service

Despite various excuses made over the past four months by the Courts and Tribunals Service as to why I had not received any official notification for the new trial against me, supposed to begin Friday, February 18th, the fact remains that the document delivered electronically, last Thursday 17th, with less than a day’s notice, was the first time I had set eyes on any official summons to attend trial.

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My humble apologies for not being Jimmy Carr

I humbly apologise to everyone for being me.

Perhaps, if I had told a joke about the Roma Holocaust — or sanctioned a millennia-old goblin-banker stereotype for Hollywood movies based on a children’s book series — things might be different: I would not again be facing jail time for causing ‘gross offence’ with another parody song.

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Belated Happy New Year To All

I’m back. For how long is uncertain but, for now, I am once again at liberty to express myself in my own home country. This new-found liberty is necessarily tempered by way of another upcoming trial for another satirical song, rendering the art of expression somewhat limited. I’m sure you get my drift.

Above: keeping busy with sourdough, making preserves and tending to my little garden.

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Chabloz trial raises more concern over “right to offend”

We will likely never know the real reason why District Judge Snow instructed that my latest trial, originally scheduled to take place March 30 and 31 at Hendon Magistrates, has now been transferred back to Westminster Magistrates Court. 

Prior to reversing the choice of venue, the judge was clearly at pains to avoid any repetition of the “procedural nightmare” instigated by my first trial (which lasted from December 2016 to June 2018, followed by the hullabaloo with probation, including a short spell in jail, later overturned on Appeal, all for composing and performing satirical songs that were uploaded to the Internet, and that were deemed by the same court to be “grossly offensive”). In all, I was in the dock for less than an hour, then invited to sit in court whilst complex directives for what is to come next were set out.

Left: outside Wesminster Magistrates last Thursday with barrister Adrian Davies.


There were three or four journalists in court. Below are links to several reports (although the term must be applied loosely to the first two).

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