Last post

Whilst pondering my situation and glancing through the reactions to last week’s guilty verdict, I am of the impression that there is less noticeable noise coming from certain self-proclaimed anti-fascist groups and their associates. Perhaps the most usual suspects are managing to resist expressing their Schadenfreude in anticipation of tomorrow’s hearing and possible media reaction. Only time will tell…

Continue reading

No comment…

Comments have been temporarily switched off on this website. For how long is uncertain. Following yesterday’s post, a number of comments and pingbacks were approved. The pingback, apparently some kind of tech issue, was quickly resolved. However, the next time I checked, another comment (plus two replies) were missing from at least one browser display. In order to not cause too many headaches before Thursday, I have decided to disable comments.

The weather is sunny and warm. Can it really be only by coincidence that, once again on Maundy Thursday, I am to be sent to prison, once again for singing a satirical song?

As mentioned yesterday and in another recent article, this latest trial against me for singing a parody song has now been dragged out for nearly two years. At the first instance hearing, when the more serious charge against me for incitement was dropped, I was already in prison and would have preferred, if found guilty and sentenced, to have continued the stretch to get it over and done with.

But no. Here we are again, at Easter (see image below from April 7th 2021), meaning two bank holidays and therefore a larger-than-usual backlog in court listings over the next fortnight. No doubt Bronzefield will once again be experiencing the usual weekend staff shortages, further exacerbated by the long weekend. And not only is it Easter: it’s also the start of the growing season, and the barbecue season… There is no end to the vindictiveness of it all.

Before leaving, I would like to express my gratitude to my barrister, Adrian Davies, whose impressive experience and knowledge of law was clearly in evidence in court last week. More precise thoughts on the two-year long, all-out effort by the Crown to further gag, punish and demoralise me, and on Judge Tempia’s ruling, shall have to wait for another day.

*

You can still contact me here. It’s also possible to donate via this page. Many thanks for all your support.







Back to Bronzefield in time for Easter

Last Friday April 7th, I was found guilty at Westminster Magistrates Court by Judge Nina Tempia of one offence under notorious Section 127, for causing gross offence with a satirical song. In an exact repetition of last year, it looks likely that I will again be spending Easter, not with friends and family, but at HMP Bronzefield.

Above: HMP Bronzefield (near Heathrow), view from House Block 3 Spur C excercise yard. Pencil drawing by Alison.

There is one semi-official rendition of proceedings to be found on Campaign Against Antisemitism’s website (CAA). Remarkably perhaps, CAA takes much of the credit, despite only one witness statement submitted almost two years ago by professional complainant Bedlam Jones.

The article fails to mention the name of the prosecution key witness, although the Crown’s expert, Dr BM from Canada, is mentioned, and the expert did pass reference to ‘CAA’s Enforcement Officer’ during cross-examination, – also without explicitly mentioning his real name.

Continue reading

Dig Down Deep & Tell Me More Lies

Tell Me More Lies is the theme from my 2016 Edinburgh Fringe show of the same name, banned for being ‘too political’. Lyrics by Gerard Menuhin, author of Tell the Truth and Shame the Devil.
Dig Down Deep was composed for my very first Edinburgh show Girl with the Guitar in 2011, and equally performed as part of my 2015 show Autumn’s Here. This is a slightly revised version.
Continue reading

An early birthday gift has arrived

Some of you will know that, last year, my birthday was spent behind bars. This year, thanks to one immensely kind and generous friend, a far nicer birthday present arrived early – a digital piano.

It’s a Yamaha Piaggero 32 and has six and half octaves of semi-weighted keys, great speakers and a very decent range of sounds. I am over the moon.

If I could get my hands on the large repertoire of professional backing tracks still in police possession, I would be able to entertain until next year’s birthday.

Continue reading

A farewell song for Henry Hafenmayer

Left, German dissident Henry Hafenmayer; right, a traditional German song taken from the collection preserved by Max Friedlaender in his major 474-page opus (Cotta, Stuttgart 1902).

Translation of song lyrics:

Brethren, let us exalt wisdom!
Sing songs, fiery and beautiful.

News of Henry Hafenmayer’s early departure came as a shock. He died two days before I was sent back to jail after losing on appeal (my sentence thus extended.) I had no idea, until last week when I was able to access my mail again.

Continue reading

Un chant d’adieu pour Henry Hafenmayer

À gauche, dissident Allemand Henry Hafenmayer; à droite, une chanson traditionnelle allemande, tirée de la collection rassemblée et conservée par Max Friedlaender dans son opus majeur de 474 pages (Cotta, Stuttgart 1902).

La traduction des paroles:

Frères, exaltons la sagesse !
Chantez des chansons, ardentes et belles.

Continue reading

Weighing my thoughts on imperial measurement

British imperial measurement contains within itself the beauty and mysticism of the natural world.

Seven weights, each the double of the one before. Seven tones for each of the major and minor scales: respectively, do re mi fa so la ti and la ti do re mi fa so – and indeed any of the other heptatonic scales (dorian, mixolydian, ect.). And let’s not forget the seven days of the week.

Continue reading

On the importance of birthdays and why social club nationalism is a blot on our lands

During the past twelve months and more of effectively being barred from publishing content on my own web page, some might be wondering, asides the obvious, how I managed to fill my time. It takes a while to get back to normal (or rather the new normal) after being incarcerated.

Above: tomatoes, potatoes, cabbage, onions can all be grown in containers.

Since my arrest in April 2020 (for which I am due to stand trial for causing gross offence with another parody song); since that arrest two years ago just as the first Lockdown began, I have learned how to grow vegetables and flowers in containers. A real Christmas tree is flourishing, as well as salads, root veg, onions and herbs. My most successful crop so far is Swiss chard, variety Bright Lights. Spring onions and carrots also did well.


Continue reading

Accused without being served

Court double-faults with poor service

Despite various excuses made over the past four months by the Courts and Tribunals Service as to why I had not received any official notification for the new trial against me, supposed to begin Friday, February 18th, the fact remains that the document delivered electronically, last Thursday 17th, with less than a day’s notice, was the first time I had set eyes on any official summons to attend trial.

Continue reading